A Final Meeting Before Robogames

This week’s focus was on making sure Jude, the sumo bot, was running properly and adding some last minute items to our list that will be going with us to Robogames. We made a decision that we were going to need two more motors, more cables for the motors and another IR sensor. A lot more testing was done on the sumo bot to make sure the sensors were reading correctly and that they will continue doing so during the final competition. More details were also talked about for our upcoming trip to Robogames. The final report was also worked on this week, and a few finishing touches are just left on that.

JUDEE

This is how our Jude, the Sumobot looks like now

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General Updates

Today the rewiring of the board was done because chassis 3.0 was printed and the wiring needed to be organized for the chassis. Current and voltage testing was also done today. The wiring that was done today is the final wiring and will be what is used for the final competition. The blog posts were also refreshed today. We also planned out our robogames strategies.

Programming Update

Ken has been hard at work making sure our robot can perform at the highest level at Robogames. With Casing 3.0 completed, Ken has been able to debug our robots 5 sensors and make sure that we have an IR sensor sampling rate that allows to efficiently and accurately see where our opponent is on the field.

Sample of code that controls bot based on reflectance sensor outputs.

Sample of code that controls bot based on reflectance sensor outputs.

Wiring

A reorganization of the sumo bot’s wiring was done.  The wires for the sensors were attached under the board so that they were out of the way of the board. The chassis 2.0 was printed and the wires were shaped and adjusted for the chassis. A few minor adjustments were made to the chassis 3.0 like readjusting the height for the back sensor hole. Minor modifications are being made at this time.

IMG_0258

Our wiring mess.

Circuit board wiring

Circuit board wiring

3D Printing

Hello:

This week I printed out the CAD drawing for Casing 1.0. The print turned out pretty good, I was concerned about the overhanging wheel mounts coming out as planned, but the little MakerBot 3D Printer was able to handle this print just fine.

I’m already planning enhancements to version 2.0. We’re going to mount the side sensors to the exterior of the robot (to give us more space inside the casing, and increase the accuracy of the sensor readings.

Here are some snapshots of the 3D Print.

 

-Joel

0-1

0

Print Percentage Error

Measured

Drawn 

Percent Error

Height

32.2

32.5

-0.923076923076914

Length

96.5

97.552

-1.07839921272758

Width

79.8

80

-0.250000000000004

Meeting on 2/13.

The main goals for this week was to get the chassis designed, buy better sensors, and get the blog posts up and running. The main designs were to be able to put the front sensors in, put the board in, and to be able to put the new sensors on the side. The sensors that we bought were pololu analog distance sensors (https://www.pololu.com/product/2474).  The reasons for these new sensors was because they have a higher refresh rate, so they take more samples faster. They’re also smaller than the original sensors we had so they would be taking less space.

Creating our Custom Chassis

Our teams head designer Joel Pederson has been doing robotics projects since high school, and he loves being able to take an idea and make it into a physical object. He is creating a custom chassis for our sumo robot. When we started this project, we used a Zumo Bot which was great for testing code, and getting our feet wet on this new scale of robotic competition.

However, to be competitive at RoboGames, our team feels it it best to create a new, custom chassis for our robot that will play to our tactical strengths and allow us to be title contenders.

So, lets talk shop. He uses Autodesk Inventor Professional 2015. And has experience in using Inventor for 5+ years. He also has experience with Solid works and Rhino 3D. So he is the excellent person to work on our sumo bot’s design.

2Casing 1.0 3Casing 1.0

This is Jude Chassis 1.0. As you can see, we have motor mounts, a sloped front (to attach a metal blade), and plenty of space for our components to be added in. Note, the top of the chassis is not shown.

The most challenging part of drawing this design has been to create a small hole underneath the front wheel mount, to be able to fit a tiny nut inside. Overall, this drawing will have taken about 4 hours to draw.

This weekend Joel is going to be cutting out sections of the chassis so we can add the reflectance sensor, side IR sensors, front-facing IR sensors, and rear IR sensors.

This being version 1.0, he’s going to be making some enhancements to our design after February 20th, when we finish wiring and configuring all internal components of the robot.

We will keep you guys updated when that happens.

Updates

The main goals for this week was to get the chassis designed, buy better sensors, and get the blog posts up and running. The main designs were to be able to put the front sensors in, put the board in, and to be able to put the new sensors on the side. The sensors that we bought were pololu analog distance sensors (https://www.pololu.com/product/2474).  The reasons for these new sensors was because they have a higher refresh rate, so they take more samples faster. They’re also smaller than the original sensors we had so they would be taking less space.

Quadrature Encoders Side Project.

20150130_153641 (1)

Since we bought micro metal gear motors that have extended shafts, we decided to try out the encoders. This week we worked on a custom made decoder for quadrature encoders and we got it running with a sample program (instructions how to build one can be found here).

Most likely we won’t be using these encoders in our final sumo because we already have brushed motors that can be controlled and we have collision detector.